Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut – Conker Tree

General Information
Common Name Horse Chestnut, Conker Tree
Scientific Name Aesculus hippocastanum
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height 20 - 30 m (65 - 100 ft)
Spread 12 - 20 m (40 - 65 ft)
Growth Rate Moderate
Bloom Time Summer
Color Green
Flower Color White
Type Tree
Native South East Europe
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass Rosidae
Order Sapindales
Family Hippocastanaceae – Horse-chestnut family
Genus Aesculus L. – buckeye
Species A. hippocastanum

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut
Aesculus hippocastanum commonly known as Horse Chestnut also called Conker Tree is a native of the Balkans and Asia Minor tree, though it also appears self-sown in some woodland. The display of prominent showy white blossoms on its arching branches is its chief attribute.
The shoots are stout, becoming pale grey or brown, with large horse-shoe-shaped scars left by the fallen leaf-stalks. The brown winter buds large sharply pointed and thickly coated with resin. The shoots flush in March and the foliage soon puts on the appearance of a damaged wing of a bird later expanding magnificently. The leaves consist of from five to save leaflets with serrated margins, and palmately arranged from a long stalk. Each leaflet becomes broader towards the tip, and then suddenly narrows to a point, the largest may reach almost a foot in length. The upper surface is a dismal dark green and hairless, the lower is covered with woolly down which soon disperses. In autumn the leaves change to yellow and gold or in parts to red.
Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut
The handsome candelabra-like inflorescence, with hermaphrodite flowers, is erect in mid-May, and may exceed a foot in height, having more than a hundred white flowers that have delicate petal edges frilled in variable patterns and a yellow blotch that turns pale crimson. The inedible fruit, one or more lustrous red-brown seeds (‘conkers’), ripens in early autumn within a tough, thick, leathery and spiky husk which has changed form pale green to dark brown. The bark is dark grayish-brown, smooth in young trees but later breaking into unevenly sized and shaped pink-brown scales, which are eventually shed. The white wood is too soft and brittle to have much practical use.
The trunk is often fluted and spreading somewhat at the base. Though self-sown trees are common, it is a ornamental rather than a woodland tree.



Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut : Seeds


Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut : Flowers

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut : Leaves

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut : Flowers

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut : Young Planet

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut

Aesculus hippocastanum – Horse Chestnut

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Callistemon viminalis – Weeping Bottlebrush

General Information
Common Name Weeping Bottlebrush
Scientific Name Callistemon viminalis
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height 4.5–6 m (15–20 ft)
Spread 3–3.5 m (12–15 ft)
Growth Rate Medium
Bloom Time Spring
Color Green
Flower Color Red
Type Tree
Native New South Wales and Queensland of Australia
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass Rosidae
Order Myrtales
Family Myrtaceae – Myrtle family
Genus Callistemon R. Br. – bottlebrush
Species C. viminalis

Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush
Callistemon viminalis commonly known as Weeping Bottlebrush. This is a evergreen small tree. It is native to the states of New South Wales and Queensland in Australia where it often occurs along watercourses. It grows up to 30 feet in height and has pendent branches with green leaves.  It blooms beautiful red flowers in full spring. The flowers look like a Bottlebrush, so it is called Weeping Bottlebrush tree. The flowers are 4 to 10 cm in length and about 3 to 6 cm in diameter. The flowers are followed by persistent woody capsules which are not noticed unless you are close to the tree. It looks so beautiful when full bloom. Callistemon viminalis is extremely adaptable in cultivation. For optimum results it should be planted in moist well-drained soil in full or partial sun. The species is susceptible to frost damage while small and suitable protection is necessary. People like to plant it as an ornamental tree and they plant weeping bottlebrush besides the road, parks and home garden.


Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush

Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush

Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush

Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush


Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush

Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush

Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush : Seeds

Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush : Trunk

Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush

Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush
Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush
Callistemon viminalis  –  Weeping Bottlebrush

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit


General Information
Common Name Jack Fruit, Jackfrut
Scientific Name Artocarpus heterophyllus
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height  9–21 m (30–70 ft)
Spread 3.5-4.7 m (12-15 ft)
Growth Rate Moderate
Bloom Time Spring
Color Green
Flower Color Green
Type Tree
Native South and Southeast Asia
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass Hamamelididae
Order Urticales
Family Moraceae – Mulberry family
Genus Artocarpus J.R. Forst. & G. Forst. – Breadfruit
Species A. heterophyllus

Huge Fruits on Jack fruit Tree
Artocarpus heterophyllus common name is Jack fruit. It is native to South and Southeast Asia, and is believed to have originated in the southwestern rain forests of India. It is mainly found and  is widely cultivated in tropical regions of India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri-Lanka, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Philippines. It is also found in the tropical regions of Africa and South America. It is one of the most popular and delicious fruits in the world. Jackfruit is the National fruits of Bangladesh. The tree grows up to 9-21m (30-70 ft) in height. This is an evergreen tree. The leaves are dark green, alternate, entire, simple glossy, leathery, stiff, large up to 15 cm (6 in) in length and elliptic to oval in form. Leaves are often deeply lobed when juvenile and on young shoots. 
Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit
The tree is monoecious, male and female flowers are borne on the same individual trees separately on short, stout stems that sprout from older branches and the trunk and male spikes are found on younger branches above female spikes.. Tiny male flowers are borne in oblong clusters 2 to 4 in (5-10 cm) in length; the female flower clusters are elliptic or rounded. It is one of the largest fruits that reaching as much as 36 kg in weight and up to 90 cm (36 in) long and 50 cm (20 in) in diameter
In generally, the seeds are collect from the ripe fruit then dried them in sun to store them for long time. The seeds can use for new plantation. The dried seeds most of time use to cook with vegetables. The wood of the tree is used for the production of musical instruments and widely used in the manufacture of furniture, doors and windows.



Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit : Young Plants
Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit : Leaves

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit : Young Plant

Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit
Artocarpus heterophyllus – Jackfruit - Jack fruit

Jack Fruit: 


Monday, July 15, 2013

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam


General Information
Common Name European Hornbeam
Scientific Name Carpinus betulus
Sun Tolerance Full Sun
Height 12–15 m (40–60 ft)
Spread 9–12 m (30–40 ft)
Growth Rate Slow
Bloom Time Spring
Color Green, Yellow
Flower Color Green
Type Tree
Native Western Asia and Europe
Classification
Kingdom Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass Hamamelididae
Order Fagales
Family Betulaceae – Birch family
Genus Carpinus L. – hornbeam
Species C. betulus

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam
Carpinus betulus Commonly known as Hornbeam is native to Western Asia and Europe, including southern England. Hornbeam in winter is frequently passed by as beech, to which it has many resemblances except that the trunk is nearly always fluted and the buds on the young shoots are slightly appraised. At other seasons the curious fruiting catkins and the saw-toothed margins of the leaves which follow them help in differentiation. Hornbeam is usually as a one-time coppiced or pollarded (often gnarled) medium-sized tree, but isolated specimens can sometimes be found in the most unexpected places.  It grows 12-15 m (40-60 ft) in height.
The young shoots are very slender and turn from green to brown. They carry pale brown slender winter buds, set alternately, and slightly bent inwards on the younger shoots. The 1-2 inch long leaves, usually ovate and with more prominent parallel veins than beech, have sharply and doubly saw-toothed margins, and are dull green on top, paler and yellowier underneath. They turn a rich yellow in autumn and on young trees below a height of about 10 feet the spent brown leaves often persist throughout the winter.


Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam
The flowers appear in April along with the opening leaves. The pendent green male catkins, borne on the previous year’s twigs, carry about ten stamens, on filaments divided below the anthers, which are orange in color when they ripen. The female catkins, borne with the current season’s growth, are much shorter than the males, and have slender crimson styles protruding from beneath long, narrow, recurring bracts, each of which carries two flowers. The small nutlike fruits, hard, flattened, and ribbed, are subtended by a large three-lobed or dagger-shaped papery appendage consisting of bract and bracteoles (secondary bracts) fused together. They ripen by October and persist after the leaves fall, draping the tree in brown.
The bole and some branches are usually fluted or prominently ribbed and have smooth, pale grey bark, often with a bright metallic sheen. The almost white wood is very hard, heavy and tough – hence its name which means ‘horny tree’. It was formerly used for ox-yokes, cogs, mallets and wooden screws, and still serves as butchers’ chopping blocks.
Hornbeam makes a good hedge. It is becoming less plentiful in woods because many of its habitats are being taken to raise crops of more profitable forest trees.


Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam : Leaves

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam 

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam : Flowers

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam : Fruits in Autumn

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam in Autumn

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam : Autumn

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam

Carpinus betulus – European Hornbeam : Autumn